Louis John Dalterio III

txchnologist:

Making Legs For Future Robotic Animal Assistants

University of South Florida computer engineer Luther Palmer is working on one of the big problems in robotics—creating legs that can move over all different types of terrain that a machine would find out in the real world. His team at the Biomorphic Robotics Lab is doing intensive computer modeling and taking tips from horses and humans on agile locomotion.

The team’s vision, like many other roboticists, is to imbue the best movement ideas developed through evolution into their machines. Palmer writes on his lab’s website that in the future, “robotic canines will gallop up stairs and over collapsed beams in burning buildings, locating occupants for rescue personnel.”

He also sees a time of robotic horses to carry heavy loads, cockroaches to conduct surreptitious surveillance and gophers to prepare alien worlds for human habitation. 

See the National Science Foundation video  and one for Palmer’s RecoRoach below.

Read More

(via fleshcoatedtechnology)

futurescope:

The future of robotics according to robotocists

At Automatica trade fair 2014 we asked the visitors of the ECHORD++ booth one simple question: “What do you think is the future of robotics?” We got the most interesting answers from roboticists from all over the world (in order of appearance): 

Vijay Kumar, University of Pennsylvania
Uwe Haass, euRobotics
Pere Homs, nelmia Robotics Insight
Christian Schlegel, Hochschule Ulm
Mary Torrico, Universidad de Tarapacá
Peter Heiligensetzer, MRK-SYSTEME
Renaud Champion, Robolution Capital
Rich Walker, Shadow Robot Company
Reza Sahand, Rahal Technology 
Vladimir Čop, SPINEA
Suraj Nair, SMErobotics
Dickshon Gange, MAS Holdings
Holger Wirth, ISRA VISION
Roko Tschakarow, SCHUNK

ECHORD++ is funded under EU’s Seventh Framework Programme for Research (FP7), Grant Agreement No. 601116.
For more information about the project please 
vistit www.echord.eu

Music:
“Quail and Robot Convo” by Podington Bear
Available on the Free Music Archive freemusicarchive.org/
Under CC BY-NC 3.0 license: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b…

“Noahs Stark” by krackatoa
Available on the Free Music Archive freemusicarchive.org/
Under CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 license: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b…
sa/3.0/legalcode

[via robohub]

(via emergentfutures)

fleshcoatedtechnology:

thinksquad:

Smartphones sold in California will soon be required to have a kill switch that lets users remotely lock them and wipe them of data in the event they are lost or stolen.

The demand is the result of a new law, signed into effect on Monday, that applies to phones manufactured after July 1, 2015, and sold in the state.

While its legal reach does not extend beyond the state’s borders, the inefficiency of producing phones solely for California means the kill switch is expected to be adopted by phone makers on handsets sold across the U.S. and around the world.

The legislation requires a system that, if triggered by an authorized user, will lock a handset to essentially make it useless. The feature must be installed and activated in new smartphones, but users will be able to deactivate it if they desire, and it must be resistant to attempts to reinstall the operating system.

Police can also use the tool, but only under the conditions of the existing section 7908 of the California Public Utilities Code. That gives police the ability to cut off phone service in certain situations and typically requires a court order, except in an emergency that poses “immediate danger of death or great bodily injury.”

The law doesn’t specify how the system locks the phone, nor what happens to the data on the phone when it’s locked. Each manufacturer can come up with their own system.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2598680/california-passes-law-mandating-smartphone-kill-switch.html

Goddamnit america, what’s wrong with you?

fleshcoatedtechnology:

thinksquad:

Smartphones sold in California will soon be required to have a kill switch that lets users remotely lock them and wipe them of data in the event they are lost or stolen.

The demand is the result of a new law, signed into effect on Monday, that applies to phones manufactured after July 1, 2015, and sold in the state.

While its legal reach does not extend beyond the state’s borders, the inefficiency of producing phones solely for California means the kill switch is expected to be adopted by phone makers on handsets sold across the U.S. and around the world.

The legislation requires a system that, if triggered by an authorized user, will lock a handset to essentially make it useless. The feature must be installed and activated in new smartphones, but users will be able to deactivate it if they desire, and it must be resistant to attempts to reinstall the operating system.

Police can also use the tool, but only under the conditions of the existing section 7908 of the California Public Utilities Code. That gives police the ability to cut off phone service in certain situations and typically requires a court order, except in an emergency that poses “immediate danger of death or great bodily injury.”

The law doesn’t specify how the system locks the phone, nor what happens to the data on the phone when it’s locked. Each manufacturer can come up with their own system.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2598680/california-passes-law-mandating-smartphone-kill-switch.html

Goddamnit america, what’s wrong with you?

futurescope:

Recycling old batteries into solar cells

A system proposed by researchers at MIT would recycle materials from discarded car batteries — a potential source of lead pollution — into new, long-lasting solar panels that provide emissions-free power.

[read more] [paper]

(via fleshcoatedtechnology)

'Incredible' rate of polar ice loss alarms scientists

climateadaptation:

Via The Guardian

(via emergentfutures)